Essential Guide To Relieving Labour Pain

August 21, 2017

Essential Guide To Relieving Labour Pain

Like most pregnant women, you, too, may fear the pain of childbirth. Thankfully, there are ways to cope with it.

Familiarise yourself with and choose the option that suits your preference and pain threshold:

1.Natural Methods
-Breathing and Relaxation. (Note: You would have learnt how to do this during your antenatal classes.)
-Massage (Tip: Get hubby to rub your lower back.)
-Warm bath
-Acupuncture
-Hypnotherapy
-TENS (transcutaneous electric nerve stimulation) machine --Works by stimulating the production of the body’s own painkillers (endorphins). (Note: You can use it in the hospital or hire it for use at home in the early stages of labour.)
Pros: Good for short labour.
Cons: Adequate in the early stages of labour but may not be enough as contraction pain becomes more severe.

2.Laughing Gas
This is given through a mask or mouthpiece.
Pros: It won’t relieve all the pain, but can take the edge off it.
Cons: Some women feel light-headed and unable to concentrate on labour.

3.Pain-relieving drugs
Diamorphine and pethidine are strong pain-relieving drugs, which are usually injected in to the thigh muscles. (In some hospitals, mums can self-administer it by pressing a button.)
Pros:Effectively reduces pain for up to four hours.
Cons:Can cause nausea and drowsiness. Cannot be used in the later part of labour. If the baby is delivered within four hours of the injection, the baby may also be drowsy . If that happens, an antidote will be given to the baby.

4.Epidural Analgesia
A type of local anaesthetic, it can be given continuously or topped up at regular intervals.
Pros: It provides complete pain relief. Good if you have a low pain threshold.
Cons:Loss of sensation in the lower half of the body.

5.Combined Spinal Epidural Analgesia (CSE)
Resembles epidural analgesia but involves additional injection of local anaesthetics.
Pros: Allows a more rapid onset of pain relief and benefits mums having moderate to severe pain.
Cons: Same as epidural analgesia.
Check with your doctor which options are available in the hospital you are delivery in.

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Size Chart
 Maternity & Nursing 
Tops / Dresses / Bottoms
Spring Size XS S M L XL XXL XXXL
US 2 4 6 8 10 12 14
UK 8 10 12 14 16 18 20
EU 34 36 38 40 42 44 46
FR 36 38 40 42 44 46 48
IT 38 40 42 44 46 48 50
Bust (inch) 34 36 38 40 42.5 45 47.5
Bust (cm) 86.5 91.5 96.5 101.5 108 114.5 120.5
Hips (in) 36 38 40 42 44 46 48
Hips (cm) 91.5 96.5 101.5 106.5 111.5 117 122
 
Intimates
Panties
Spring Size S–M L–XL
US 4 6 8 10
UK 10 12 14 16
EU 36 38 40 42
FR 38 40 42 44
IT 40 42 44 46
Hips (in) 38 40 42 44
Hips (cm) 96.5 101.5 106.5 111.5
 
International Size Conversion
AU/NZ US UK EU/CN
12B 34B 34C 75C
12C 34C 34D 75D
12D 34D 34DD 75E
12DD 34DD 34E 75F
14B 36B 36C 80C
14C 36C 36D 80D
14D 36D 36DD 80E
14DD 36DD 36E 80F
14E 36E 36F 80G
16B 38B 38C 85C
16C 38C 38D 85D
16D 38D 38DD 85E
16DD 38DD 38E 85F
16E 38E 38F 85G
18C 40C 40D 90D
18D 40D 40DD 90E
18DD 40DD 40E 90F
20D 42C 42DD 95E
20DD 42DD 42E 95F
 
Baby/Kid Size Chart

Rompers, Tops & Pants

Spring Size

Height (cm)

Weight (kg)

0–3 months

55–61

3.6–5.7

3–6 months

62–67

5.7–7.5

6–12 months

68–78

7.5–11

2 years

79–86

11.1–13.6

3 years

87–94

13.7–15

Non-Apparels 

Accessories

Item

Size (cm)

Pillow

30.5 × 12.5 (S)

44 × 35 (L)

Bolster

39.5 × 12.5 (S)

60 × 14 (L)

Bedsheet

132 × 71 × 15

Receiving Blanket

76 × 76

Swaddle

55.9 × 40.6